Top Ten Tuesday: Top Ten Book That Would Be on My Syllabus if I Taught New Adult Romance 101

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish. This week’s theme is Top Ten Books That Would Be On Your Syllabus If You Taught X 101 (examples: YA fantasy 101, feminist literature 101, magic in YA 101, classic YA lit 101, world-building 101). I chose New Adult Romance 101. I tried to pick different authors and different types of stories in the genre. All of these books gave me “the feels.”

Top Ten Books That Would Be On My Syllabus if I Taught New Adult Romance 101:

1. Left Drowning by Jessica Park

 Left Drowning

2. Bright Side by Kim Holden

Bright Side (Bright Side, #1)

3. Ugly Love by Colleen Hoover

Ugly Love

4. Archer’s Voice by Mia Sheridan

Archer's Voice

5. Falling Into You by Jasinda Wilder

Falling into You (Falling, #1)

6. There is No Light in Darkness by Claire Contreras

There is No Light in Darkness (Darkness, #1)

7. Broken by Lauren Layne

Broken (Redemption, #1)

8. Sincerely, Carter by Whitney G.

Sincerely, Carter

9. The Mistake by Elle Kennedy

The Mistake (Off-Campus, #2)

10. How We Deal with Gravity by Ginger Scott

What New Adult book would you add to my list? Let me know in the comments.

Home is Where You Are

Home is Where You Are Home is Where You Are by Tessa Marie(Theresa Paolo)

Publication Date: October 8, 2014

Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Format

Synopsis:

Anna is the perfect, rule following student. She has a 4.0 and volunteers all her spare time to fill up her Ivy League applications. Dean isn’t so lucky. His parents are gone, his foster parents abused him and now he’s living on the streets. Each day he’s trying simply to survive. Once they meet, Dean and Anna can’t help but fall for each other. Anna would do anything for Dean, but he isn’t convinced he has what it takes to survive. Anna hopes she can be the one to convince Dean that life is worth fighting for.

My rating: 5 out of 5 stars

Home is Where You Are is an incredibly touching teenage love story. It had me hooked from the beginning. I couldn’t help but feel for Dean. Each of his chapters (even the happier ones) were heartbreaking. At times, I found Anna’s perfection a little annoying but I loved how being with Dean transformed her. I loved how they gave each other hope and truly brought out the best in each other.

I would definitely suggest Home is Where You Are to my YA contemporary romance reading friends. If you have a Kindle, it’s a Kindle Unlimited book and it’s also in the Prime lending library.

Top Ten Tuesday: Top Ten Of Your Auto-buy Authors

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish. This week’s theme is Top Ten Of Your Auto-buy Authors (no matter the genre or what it’s about…you’ll buy it from these authors!). Here is my list.

1. Maggie Stiefvater – YA Urban Fantasy

The Raven Boys (The Raven Cycle, #1)

2. Colleen Hoover – New Adult & YA

Confess

3. Karen White – Fiction

The Beach Trees

4. Jill Shalvis – Contemporary Romance

Animal Magnetism (Animal Magnetism, #1)

5. Kristan Higgins – Contemporary Romance

The Best Man (Blue Heron, #1)

6. Jessica Park – New Adult

Left Drowning

7. Kasie West – YA Contemporary

On the Fence

8. Rainbow Rowell – YA and Adult

Eleanor & Park

9. Kate Perry – Contemporary Romance

Perfect for You (Laurel Heights, #1)

10. Bella Andre – Contemporary Romance & New Adult

The Look of Love (The Sullivans, #1)

Which authors make your auto-buy list? Tell me in the comments!

Mud Vein

 Mud VeinMud Vein by Tarryn Fisher

Publication Date: March 8, 2014

Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

Synopsis:

What should be a boring thirty-third birthday for Senna Richards is anything but. Instead of waking up in her own bed, the author wakes up in a house she cannot identify. As she explores her surroundings, Senna finds the house sits alone in the middle of an expanse of snow, surrounded by an electrical fence. She’s trapped. There’s no way to escape–unless she can unravel the clues her captor has left.

My rating: 5 out of 5 stars

This is the first book I’ve read by Tarryn Fisher. Well, that’s not entirely true. I read Never Never which is a collaboration between Colleen Hoover and Tarryn Fisher. After reading it, I decided to read something by Tarryn Fisher because I liked what I read in Never Never and I’ve already read all of Colleen Hoover‘s books.

Mud Vein is a book that sticks with you long after you’ve finished reading it. It’s dark, twisted and a lot disturbing. Mud Vein is not the book for you if you’re looking for something light and happy. It was mentally exhausting. I actually had to take little breaks while reading it and read a romance at the same time. I needed to let my brain relax. It was just so intense all of the time.

Mud Vein is definitely one of those books that the less you know about it when you begin reading, the better it is. While the story isn’t always fun to read (Like I said, it’s dark and twisted.), it’s beautifully written and well-crafted. It was very thought provoking. If you like dark and disturbing thrillers, this one is for you.

Wild Reckless

Wild Reckless by Ginger Scott

Publication Date: March 17, 2015

Publisher: Ginger Scott

Synopsis:

Thanks to Kensington Worth’s parents, her senior year of high school is going to suck. Instead of completing high school at her Chicago private school with her best friends, she’s stuck at a public school in the middle of nowhere. She should be practicing piano with her favorite instructor. Now, she’s practicing solo in her new dining room. It just isn’t fair. To top it all off, her new neighbor has it out for her. He’s doing everything to ruin what little she has left.

All the rumors are true. Owen Harper is trouble. Everyone knows it. He’s wild and he’s reckless. Since he’s trying to ruin Kensi’s life, she should be running in the opposite direction. But after one horrible night, she can’t stay away from him. Kensi sees things in him no one else does. She knows those rumors cover up something more, something good.

My rating: 5 out of 5 stars

This book! Oh, man. I loved this book. It was soooo good. If I could give it more than 5 stars, I would. It dealt with so many issues and brought out so many feelings. I want to say more about it, but I’m at a loss for words. It’s that good. It makes me want to dump my TBR list and read the rest of Ginger Scott’s books immediately.

Wild Reckless is a contemporary romance that YA, NA and adult readers will enjoy. I think readers that love Colleen Hoover, Tammara Webber and Jessica Park will especially enjoy this Ginger Scott novel.

Top Ten Tuesday: Top Ten Authors I’ve Read The Most Books From

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish. This week’s theme is Top Ten Authors I’ve Read The Most Books From. I looked up my top ten authors on Goodreads. There are some ties betweens authors and they are in order below.

1. Nora Roberts

Vision in White (Bride Quartet, #1)

89 books

2. J.D. Robb

Naked in Death (In Death, #1)

42 books

3. Jill Shalvis

Animal Magnetism (Animal Magnetism, #1)

34 books

4. Marie Force

All You Need is Love (Green Mountain, #1)

34 books

5. Charlaine Harris

Dead Until Dark (Sookie Stackhouse, #1)

32 books

6. Robyn Carr

Virgin River (Virgin River, #1)

32 books

7. Bella Andre

Breathless In Love (The Maverick Billionaires, #1)

30 books

8. Susan Mallery

Chasing Perfect (Fool's Gold, #1)

30 books

9. Kate Perry

Perfect for You (Laurel Heights, #1)

24 books

10. Rachel Gibson

Truly Madly Yours (Truly, Idaho, #1)

23 books

Do you know what I noticed about this list? All but Charlaine Harris are romance authors. All of these authors have series with multiple books. If I were continue down the list, it would be a similar situation. I obviously like romantic series. 😉

What author have you read the most books by? Tell me in the comments!

ARC Review: Romancing the Dark in the City of Light

Romancing the Dark in the City of LightRomancing the Dark in the City of Light by Ann Jacobus

Publication Date: October 6, 2015

Publisher: St. Martin’s Griffin

Synopsis:

Summer Barnes is stuck in France. She’s living with her mom and redoing her senior year of high school after being kicked out of four boarding schools. Summer really needs to get on the right path and graduate high school, but she can barely make it through the day. If she could just meet the perfect guy, it would be the answer to everything. Her life would be so much better — maybe even worth living.

As she starts her new school and navigates Paris, Summer meets not just one guy but two. They’re very different. Moony is a classmate with problems of his own. He brings out the best parts of Summer, parts she didn’t know existed. Kurt is a handsome older man, but there’s something alarming about him. He takes Summer to places she never thought she wanted to go.

Summer struggles with which version of herself she wants to be. Can she be as good as Moony thinks she is? Or is she stuck being as worthless as she feels when she’s with Kurt?

My rating: 5 out of 5 stars

Romancing the Dark in the City of Light is a book that kind of snuck up on me. From the description, I thought it was going to be about a troubled girl looking for a guy to fix her. I knew there was going to be depression and suicidal thoughts. What I didn’t expect was a story about a girl coping with not only her father’s death but her own alcohol addiction.

I loved the way Romancing the Dark in the City of Light portrayed Summer’s addiction. Her feelings of helplessness were easy to relate to. While I didn’t necessarily like Summer, I could feel her pain. I wanted her to make healthy decisions and succeed, to rise out of the darkness.

Summer’s two love interests, Moony and Kurt, added another whole dimension to the story. I loved Moony and his determination. It was amazing that he was willing to support Summer when it wasn’t always in his best interest. Kurt was….well, he was different. I hated him, but I liked they way his character had Summer on the edge.

My absolute favorite thing about the entire book is the last 1/4 of the novel. Up until then, I was planning on giving it 4 stars. The writing was beautiful, but it was just so dark and depressing! I wanted at least a glimmer of sunshine somewhere on those pages! But then the last 1/4 of the book happened and I felt like I finally got it. I won’t even hint at what happens, but it was enough to make me add that final star.

Romancing the Dark in the City of Light is truly a beautiful book about teenage substance abuse, suicide and family ties.

I would like to thank Goodreads and St. Martin’s Griffin for the opportunity to read and honestly review Romancing the Dark in the City of Light.

How We Deal with Gravity

How We Deal with GravityHow We Deal with Gravity by Ginger Scott

Publication Date: June 11, 2014

Publisher: Ginger Scott

Synopsis:

Nothing in Avery Abbot’s life has gone as planned. She dropped out of college to get married and have a baby. Then, her husband left her without a backward glance when their one-year-old son, Max, was diagnosed with autism.

Now, Avery plans her days around Max’s needs. What she wouldn’t give for someone to share her joys and pains with. But Avery knows her chance at love has passed. Or at least she thinks it has until Mason Street saunters back into town.

Mason’s spent the last five years on the road with his band, living his dream–until it all came crashing down. With a dropped record contract and nowhere else to go, he ends up back where his love for music began: the Abbot house.

While Mason’s rediscovering his love for music, he’s also learning about the kind of person he is. He thought he and Avery were friends, but her reception of him is less than friendly. Can he prove to her that he’s changed?

My rating: 5 out of 5 stars

How We Deal with Gravity is the first book I’ve ever read by Ginger Scott. A friend on Goodreads suggested it for a buddy read and since I always like the books the people in the group suggest, I decided to join in. I’m so happy I did!

How We Deal with Gravity sucked me in from the Prologue. It had me close to tears. I do not have a child with autism, but I do have a nephew with it. I could totally picture my sister-in-law as Avery. The selflessness Ginger Scott gives Avery is the same selflessness I see in my sister-in-law.  It made me love Avery’s character even more.

And Mason. Oh, Mason. What a special guy. He may just be my new favorite book boyfriend. Mason starts out as kind of a jerk, but I loved the way he tackled learning that he wasn’t all that. The way treats not just Avery but the entire Abbot family warmed my heart.

The writing and storyline were spectacular. Mason and Avery’s chemistry was hot! There were even a couple of things I didn’t see coming in the story. I honestly don’t have even one complaint about it.

How We Deal with Gravity has cemented Ginger Scott’s place as one of my favorite go-to authors.  I can’t wait to read another one of her novels.

Top Ten Tuesday: Ten Fairytale Retellings I’ve Read/Want to Read

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish. This week’s theme is Ten Fairytale Retellings I’ve Read/Want To Read (or you could do fairytales I want to be retold or fairytales I love). My list will also include fables and Shakespeare since I haven’t read a ton of fairytale based novels. I guess I need to branch out more! Here is my list:


1. Impossible 
by Nancy Werlin

– Scarborough Fair

(Read)

Impossible (Impossible, #1)


2. Extraordinary 
by Nancy Werlin

-Wicked / The Wizard of OZ

(Read)

Extraordinary


3. Isn’t She Lovely 
by Lauren Layne

– Pygmalion

(Read)

Isn't She Lovely (Redemption, #0.5)


4. Broken
 by Lauren Layne

– Beauty and the Beast

(Read)

Broken (Redemption, #1)


5. Crushed 
by Lauren Layne

-The Ugly Duckling

(Read)

Crushed (Redemption, #2)


6. Cinder & Ella 
by Kelly Oram

-Cinderella

(Read)

Cinder & Ella


7. Finding Cinderella
by Colleen Hoover

– Cinderella

(Read)

Finding Cinderella (Hopeless, #2.5)


8. Vendetta 
by Catherine Doyle

– Romeo and Juliet

(Read)

Vendetta (Blood for Blood, #1)


9. A Court of Thorns and Roses 
by Sarah J. Maas

– Beauty and the Beast

(Want to read)

A Court of Thorns and Roses (A Court of Thorns and Roses, #1)


10. The Iron King 
by Julie Kagawa

–  Midsummer Night’s Dream

(Want to read)

The Iron King (The Iron Fey, #1)

What are some of your favorite fairytale retelling or ones you would like to read? Tell me in the comments!

The Impossible Knife of Memory

The Impossible Knife of MemoryThe Impossible Knife of Memory by Laurie Halse Anderson

Publication Date: January 2, 2014

Publisher: Viking Children’s

Synopsis:

Hayley Kincain is spending her senior year of high school in high school. For most kids that would be normal. For Hayley, it’s a tough transition from being homeschooled on the road with her Iraq war veteran father.

Hayley’s trying to lead a normal life. She has a new best friend in Grace and a possible boyfriend in Finn. If only her father’s transition was as easy. Riddled with PTSD, he can barely keep it together. Hayley’s doing everything she can to keep him safe, but she’s worried it might not be enough.

My rating: 3 out of 5 stars

The Impossible Knife of Memory left me feeling kind of…blah. I had such high expectations for it. It just didn’t meet most of them. I can’t decide whether I liked it or not. There were some really great things about it, but there were also things I didn’t like or get.

The writing was amazing. It flowed well and kept me reading when I might have wanted to set the book down. I read it in two days.

I liked the PTSD topic and how Hayley’s dad was portrayed. Even though he wasn’t very likeable, he felt real and I couldn’t help but feel compassion for him and anyone else dealing with returning from war.

I couldn’t stand Hayley most of the time. Her denial of her dad’s condition was understandable, as was her warped sense of the past. Her habit of referring to her classmates as zombies drove me nuts. I just didn’t get it. The only time I really felt like I could connect with her character was toward the end of the book.

I also couldn’t stand Hayley’s dad’s flashbacks. I don’t know why we were treated to them, but they didn’t add anything to the story for me. At least the memories Hayley had were able to show how she was twisting her own truth.

So while I loved the writing and the issue the story was tackling, there were just too many things I didn’t like. I will be trying another of Laurie Hulse Anderson’s stories in the future since she’s obviously a talented author.